Thursday 23rd January 1947 – “He has something wrong with his face and it’s so catching he isn’t to use telephones etc.”

14400541,
L/Cpl Moore J.,
etc.

11 a.m.
Thurs.
23 Jan ’47

Dear All,

Gordon, George and John – Haifa January 1947

Afraid this won’t be a very long letter because I haven’t got a letter to answer.

We haven’t been quite so busy so far this week but now a lot of units are moving so we shall have more work to do in a couple of days.

The weather has managed to keep fine for two days now but it’s cold all the time. It’s difficult to imagine now what hot weather is like but it won’t need much imagination in three or four months time.

I see they’ve fixed the closing date for 48 group at April 27th so I will at least be out by that date. Actually I expect to be out about the first week in April and should leave here in about seven weeks time.

Gordon is on the sick list now. He has something wrong with his face and it’s so catching he isn’t to use telephones etc. so he is doing nothing at all.

That’s about all for now but I won’t close as there might be some mail later on in the day.

8.30 p.m.

Well there wasn’t any mail for me today so I’ll sign off now, hoping to hear from you in a day or two.

Cheerio,
Lots of Love,
John
xxxxxx

Posted in 1947 | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Sunday 19th January 1947 – “It turned out to be another “do” like the one about a fortnight ago”

John with George after raid in Benyamina, January 1947

14400541,
L/Cpl Moore J.,
etc.

Sunday
19 Jan ’47

Dear All,

When I wrote on Thursday I quite expected to have a full night in bed that night but it was not to be so. I was awakened at 2 a.m. on Friday morning and told to be ready to move in an hour. It turned out to be another “do” like the one about a fortnight ago. We were out from about 5 o’clock until about 2 o’clock in the afternoon. It was quite an uneventful episode and I got fed up with it. I have just been unlucky to get caught for the last two “outings” as both times it has been my shift which has been most convenient to send.

The weather is slightly warmer now, but it’s too early to say the winter is over. I suppose we shall get a lot more rain before the end of February.

Thanks for Gwladys’s letter of the 9th. which came through on Friday.

I’m glad to know the New Year Party was a success. I don’t know what “radio forfeits” is like because we can’t pick up the Light Programme out here. We only get the General Forces and local Forces stations.

I was rather surprised to hear that Dorrell is taking so much interest in the activities at Anstey. I haven’t heard from him for some time but I’m not sure if it’s his turn to write or not.

Well I’ve just received Mam’s letter of the 13th, thanks for that also.

I haven’t heard from Ron yet. Gordon is still here and is the same as ever.

I was pleased to hear that the Hopkinsons and Mrs Spence often ask about me. It’s so easy for people to forget nowadays that so many fellows are still away from home.

They’ve started education here again. I’m in the top class (English and Maths) but it’s very elementary and no use to me at all. Apparently the Maths chap realised this because he said “How far have you gone with this stuff?” When I told him I had Matric he said he would see about getting me off it.

Well that’s about all once again. Hope you are all well. I’ve now completely got rid of my cold.

Lots of Love,
John
xxxxxx

Posted in 1947 | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Thursday 16th January 1947 – “an inspection last Saturday, another on Monday, another yesterday, another today, and tomorrow there is another inspection of tents etc. plus a rifle inspection”

14400541,

L/Cpl Moore J.,
etc.

Thurs.
16-1-47

Dear Dad,

Just a few lines to wish you all the best for the 22nd. I know birthdays don’t mean much to you now (except a reminder that you will soon be retiring!) but I like you to know that I remember the date.

Tell Gwladys I got the parcel of magazines etc. yesterday and thank her very much.

I must admit that I’m pretty fed up with this life and only the prospect of an early release keeps me going. We had an inspection last Saturday, another on Monday, another yesterday, another today, and tomorrow there is another inspection of tents etc. plus a rifle inspection. That is in addition to our normal duties including night work. It’s deadly, exactly the opposite of what orders Monty has issued. Still the more they pile it on the more I’ll enjoy being out when the time comes!

I suppose you are busy with hatching now. How’s the new incubator working?

The weather is still wintry here but not quite so wet as a few days ago.

I have written to Ron after several unsuccessful attempts to phone him. I want to keep in touch with him so that if he leaves here at the same time as me we can meet on the boat.

Well I want to make the most of a night off and go to the pictures. You don’t blame me do you? When you take into consideration the list of grouses above!

Cheerio for now
Love,
John
xxxx

Posted in 1947 | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Sunday 12th January 1947 – “We are all confined to camp this week-end”

14400541,
L/Cpl Moore J.,
Royal Signals
etc.

6 p.m.
Sunday
12 Jan 47

Dear All,

I said I’d write again today but there’s practically nothing to write about.

We are all confined to camp this week-end. It doesn’t make much difference to me as I was on duty all morning this morning and I’m on from now till eight o’clock tomorrow morning. There was an inspection yesterday morning and the turn out was far from satisfactory. So everybody had to parade yesterday afternoon and again this morning. Everybody has been doing the gardens round the tents this afternoon. There is another inspection tomorrow morning but as I shall be coming off night duty I shall be in bed.

Tomorrow night there is a show on and I have a ticket for it.

Kath tells me that the other day Pete Russell was supposed to be starting back at the office. Instead of reporting for work he calmly rang Mac up and said he wouldn’t be coming back, he was “going into business at Birmingham”. So that’s that! I don’t think Mac or anybody else will be very disappointed.

That’s about all once again. So I’ll say cheerio for now.

Hope you are all well.
Lots of Love,
John
xxxxxx

Posted in 1947 | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Friday 10th January 1947 – “The army will never change, no matter what Monty says”

14400541,

L/Cpl Moore J.,
Royal Signals
etc.

Friday
10-1-47

Dear All,

Here we are again. I started writing this afternoon but didn’t get very far before I was interrupted. Then after dinner we went to the pictures so it is now 10 p.m. Still I have time to write a couple of pages.

We are very busy these days. There was a time when I could write all my letters during duty hours but now it is one long rush all the time. Still it passes the time away more quickly, and we shall soon be half way through January.

What’s the weather like now? It’s rather miserable here all the time – cold and damp with not much sunshine. A lot different from six months ago. We haven’t had all that much rain yet though and in another six weeks it will be getting warm.

Thanks for Dad’s letter received today. Very pleased to hear that last Saturday evening was successful, it must have been a busy time for the three of you.

There’s an inspection by the Brigadier tomorrow so we shall be panicking before breakfast. The Brigadier is a nice chap but he has to do these inspections etc. It makes me sick but there it is. The army will never change, no matter what Monty says.

Well it’s late now so I must close. I’m on duty Sunday morning and night and we shouldn’t be too busy so I’ll write again then.

Cheerio
Lots of Love,
John
xxxxxxxx

Posted in 1947 | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Monday 6th January 1947 – “There was a bit of a raid on a Jewish settlement”

14400541,
L/Cpl Moore J.,
etc.

Monday
6 Jan 47

Dear All,

Now for a longer letter I hope.

I can tell you now that yesterday some if us went out in the early hours of the morning. There was a bit of a raid on a Jewish settlement. We went out at 2 a.m. and got back in the afternoon. There was nothing much to it but quite a few people were questioned and detained. We are now back to normal again.

The weather is bitterly cold again. I wonder what it is like at home now as far as weather is concerned. I’m sure I shall feel the cold when I get home.

Thanks for Mam’s letter of the 30th which came today. The mail has been held up a bit lately for some reason or other.

Sorry to hear Dad had a cold but I hope it is better now. I also hope you had an enjoyable time last Saturday evening.

Glad you like the two snaps I sent. I wasn’t actually smoking the pipe, I never do smoke it, but it made for a bit of variety as far as the snap was concerned.

Please don’t save a tin of fruit for when I get home. I know how you feel but you haven’t had luxuries like that for so long and we often get fruit here. Of course when I get home I shall be living on your rations again so I might be glad of a taste of fruit again.

On the whole our food isn’t too good now. We get peas for practically every meal and apart from that it is very monotonous.

I shall write to Uncle Charlie either tonight or tomorrow. Pleased to hear he is well and had a nice Christmas.

Unfortunately I wasn’t able to go to Bethlehem. There were vacancies for people to go for carol singing but nobody could go from here because of duties.

Well I think that is all once again. I’ll be writing again about Thursday.

Hope you are well, I’m fine.
Cheerio
Love,
John
xxxxxx

Posted in 1947 | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Saturday 4th January 1947 – “I suppose you read all about the trouble in Palestine a couple of days ago”

14400541,
L/Cpl Moore J.,
etc.

Sat.
4-1-47

Dear All,

Sorry I haven’t written for a few days but it has been absolutely impossible. Even now I only have time to write a very short letter. I suppose you read all about the trouble in Palestine a couple of days ago.

Nothing happened very near here but it made us a lot of extra work. Tonight we shall get no sleep at all, but things will be more settled in a couple of days.

Anyway don’t worry about me. I know it’s hard for you but please don’t worry. If you don’t hear for a few more days it’s because we are busy but I’ll be writing again at the first possible opportunity.

Hope you are all well
Cheerio
Love,
John
xxxxxxxx

Posted in 1947 | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Wednesday 1st January 1947 – “There’s a pack of wild dogs howling away in the orange groves”

14400541,
L/Cpl Moore J.,
etc.

Wednesday
1 Jan ’47

Dear All,

Just a few lines. I intend being in bed early tonight to try to shake my cold off. It’s a lot better than it was and I think an early night in bed will get rid of it altogether.

Thanks for Dad’s letter of the 22nd. and Gwladys of the 25th. I could just imagine listening to the turkey sizzling in the oven. It’s all those little things which go to make a proper Xmas and no matter how good a time the army give you, all those things are still missing. Still it’s one now – no more army Christmases.

New Year came in without any excitement. I wasn’t on duty last night so I didn’t “see” 1947 in.

That new incubator of Dad’s sounds interesting, but surely it’s a job to watch it, and what a lot of work when the eggs hatch. But of course it must be divided into compartments, which hatch at various times.

I’ll write to Uncle Charlie in a day or two. Did he have a nice Christmas?

I think I told you once that we might be moving from here in January and then I later said we were staying here. Well a rumour has started now that we are moving in ten days time! Personally I doubt it, and I hope it’s not right. We shall know soon anyway.

Example of Monty’s new army (no unnecessary parades) :- we had to get up at 6 a.m. this morning and do the gardens round the tents from 6.30 – 7.30. It’s a good job some of the older chaps aren’t still in the army. They wouldn’t have stood for it. I’ll certainly be glad to get away from it all.

Well I’ll close now. I shall be writing again in a couple of days.

Hope you are all well and free from colds.

Lots of Love,
John
xxxxxxxx

P.S. There’s a pack of wild dogs howling away in the orange groves. They make a terrible noise and sometimes in the middle of the night they come close to the tents. Fortunately they are harmless.

Posted in 1947 | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Sunday 29th December 1946 – “I’ll be writing again in 1947 – demob year”

14400541,
L/Cpl Moore J.,
etc.

Sunday
29 Dec. 46

Dear All,

I haven’t heard from you since I last wrote and there isn’t much news so this will only be a short letter. There was a big pile of mail today but I was unlucky.

We have really settled down again after Xmas, and we are still fairly busy. I was on duty this afternoon and it was much busier than a normal Sunday.

We went to the pictures last night and saw “Keep Your Powder Dry”. It was a very poor film.

I have been trying to contact Ron on the phone for the last few days. I have rung him up twice and he wasn’t there and I know he has rung up twice when I wasn’t there. On Friday morning when I was on duty he rang up but I was so busy that I only had time to say “Ring up about ten o’clock tonight.” I don’t know what happened but he didn’t ring up. No doubt he’ll ring up again sometime. He did have time to tell me he had a good Xmas.

I’ve got a bit of a cold now. I don’t know how I caught it, perhaps it was the cold weather about a week ago.

What’s the pantomime like this year and are you going?

Well I think that’s about all for now. I’ll be writing again in 1947 – demob year.

Cheerio,
Lots of Love,
John
xxxx

Posted in 1946 | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Friday 27th December 1946 – “surplus of beer, the one thing that spoils army Christmases”

14400541,
etc.

Fri.
27-12-46

Dear All,

You’ll have to excuse the paper but I’m on duty now and forgot to bring my pad so this is all I have.

Well Christmas is over again, and as usual it makes you wonder if it was worth all the excitement. Still we didn’t have a bad time here, and I hope you had a nice time too.

Actually nothing much happened here apart from the fact that we had more than enough to eat. We had tea in bed Christmas morning after which I was on duty till dinner time. The officers waited on us at dinner; they were all dressed up. The Brigadier, in a blue apron, gave a little speech in which he said he hoped we would all be home again soon etc. Then we had soup, turkey etc. Xmas pudding, oranges, nuts, apples, mince pies etc. A band was playing to us and all round it was quite enjoyable. After that it was my turn for duty again. There was no work to do but somebody had to be there all the time. Tea, fortunately, was very light, consisting of Xmas cake and mince pies. In the evening there was a so called party which wasn’t much of a success owing to a surplus of beer, the one thing that spoils army Christmases.

Boxing day was more or less a repetition of Christmas day. Nobody felt very hungry and it was a case of relaxing and recuperating. I was on duty in the afternoon. I wanted to go to a show at night but there were no tickets available. Afterwards I learned that I could have got in without a ticket but it was too late then. Gordon was on duty so apart from going to the NAAFI for a bit, all I did was to sit with him. Today has been a normal day, in fact we have been very busy, as work has been piling up over Christmas.

So ends my last army Christmas, the fifth and last. A couple of chaps arrived in this section last week, this was their first army Christmas. They think it might be their last but I think they are in for a shock.

Well I must close now. We are still busy and it has taken me over an hour to write this much. I’ll probably write again tomorrow or Sunday

Cheerio,
Lots of Love,
John
xxxxxxx

Posted in 1946 | Tagged , | Leave a comment